Sauté Pans

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Why You Need Saute Pans

Saute pans are a necessity in a cook’s arsenal and you certainly don’t want to cook with a cheap saute pan. It gets its name from, you guessed it, French. It originates from the word Sauter which means to jump. It is specially designed to toss back and forth ingredients over a stovetop without overcrowding it. It gives anything from fruit to vegetables and meat and even cook with a golden browning. 

Saute Pan Vs Frying Pan

The difference between a saute pan and a frying pan is not something everyone knows, especially if you don’t spend extensive time in the kitchen. The difference is actually quite subtle that it’s entirely valid that you may not have done a deep dive to figure out the difference earlier on. Here are some of the key differences:

Oven usage — they are good to go from the stovetop straight into the oven whenever necessary. This is something you can’t always achieve with other pans, especially non-stick pans. Since it’s a common practice to sear a piece of meat and then send it to the oven to cook on the inside, it is excellent for steaks and cooking fish. 

Pan structure — it differs from most in the structure of the sides of it. It has straight, vertical sides while frying pans’ sides tend to taper outwards. 

Lid — while it looks quite a similar side by side, much of the difference lies in the lid. A saute pan typically comes with a lid while another pan does not.

Heat containment — other frying pans may be able to hold heat longer than a saute pan — a cast iron skillet is a good example of this. However, a saute pan heats up much quicker than most frying pans. 

Material — saute pans are commonly made of a conductive material such as copper or aluminum while other pans are often made of stainless steel and carbon steel. Additionally, it can have a non-stick coating while it never has this element. 

What to cook — There really aren’t any limitations to what food you can cook in each, but there are some recommendations worth considering. For frying pans, it’s best to cook stir-fries with vegetables and meat, crisping up potatoes, and quickly making eggs. Saute pans are optimal for braising meat, searing meat before sending it off to the oven, and shallow sauteing. 

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